Holiday IoT and the Performance Imperative

A few words to manufacturers and vendors of tech toys: to really be ready for the holiday, if your product requires software updates in order to work or is in any way internet connected, make sure your site stays up. Otherwise, you just shipped coal.

  • Provide more than one distribution point for downloadable updates/binaries
  • Rely on CDNs for static assets (like installers and documentation)
  • If your update process must rely on live services, make sure they’re scalable
    • Load test subcomponents/microservices AND the end-to-end process
  • Be prepared for damage control by:
    • Monitoring site uptime and availability to know when things are broken
    • Proactively establish a communication channel with customers during issues
    • Properly staff IT and support for during AND post-season issues
  • Make sure the cost of downtime is factored into your next sales cycle

Santa Brought Us a Brick?

Let me start by admitting how 1st-world this example is. Robots as play-things are still not exactly ‘so easy, a child could do it’, and Roomba’s have been around for almost two decades, but we still have yet to see a really down-to-earth home robotics project that really works for children under 10. I don’t just mean toys that are not pre-assembled, even the right-out-of-the-box kind often require firmware updates or online services to really work as expected.

Case in point, the Meccano MAX. Though it only took about 3hrs total to put together, this morning when we finally turned it on and went to connect for a firmware update, the vendor’s website was down…hard. The instructions said, before anything else, update the ‘MeccaMind’ and voice commands weren’t working without, so, blocker.

As an ops nerd, I slapped an uptime monitor on it to know when (if ever) it was back up:

That didn’t stop the whole multi-day experience from deflating to a dud. We all worked on this thing together and then before it can do anything, we are stuck guessing about when we can actually enjoy it. Don’t blame Santa, blame the geniuses at Meccano.

Performance, of your product, of your service, of your site, is imperative to delivering what you sold people. Availability, uptime, scalability, and reliability matter by default now. Everyone has downtime, but 4hr recovery time on your corporate domain isn’t just irresponsible and costly, it’s plain embarrassing…and transparent.

Why Is This Even Important?

My 7yr old is crazy into coding right now. Granted, we use a visual Code Block Editor mostly for lights and tones, but it’s a great way to introduce concepts like flow control and formal logic. As soon as she saw an example I built that used function blocks to encapsulate and reuse logic, she instantly understood and started refactoring her programs.

But finding the right project for varying stages of aptitude, appetite, and enjoyment is a real challenge. No thanks to marketing, but also unanticipated road-blocks like service and subscription dependencies are hard for consumers to factor in when purchasing. Even when you do find a right-fit project, if bone-headed problems like website downtime occur, it can become a negative experience for the child (or student).

It’s important for STEM product manufacturers and software vendors to really think about the impact of what they’re selling, how they’re delivering it, and how to support people who paid them money for something to accomplish a goal. If you don’t have the optimal consumer’s experience in mind, it will eventually cost you.

Need the Robot Software Updater?

I can’t archive everything on their site, and it’s their job to provide reliable content distribution, but in case you find yourself stuck like I was, here are links to at least the firmware updater tool:

Also, never ask a consumer if they want to choose (null).

And if the updater gives you flashbacks to DirectX drivers from 1997, don’t worry. It only looked like it bricked my robot for about 4mins before providing UI feedback:


Once you do get back to the modern era, a 98.6MB mobile app to control it shouldn’t be too hard on your data plan. They also need to know your GPS location, phone contacts, and file storage for some reason.

Value Chain in DevOps

Foreward: Since I highly doubt the following concepts will see the light of day in the final draft of IEEE 2675, I wanted to document that in fact I pushed this to the group June 15th 2017. During a subsequent review, it got huge push-back from our Curator in Chief, the early first of a future string of events that lead me to publish this primary work on my personal blog.

What is a ‘value chain’?

value chain is a set of activities that a firm operating in a specific industry performs in order to deliver a valuable product or service for the market. The concept comes through business management and was first described by Michael Porter in his 1985 publication, Competitive Advantage: Creating and Sustaining Superior Performance.[1]

The idea of the value chain is based on the process view of organizations, the idea of seeing a manufacturing (or service) organization as a system, made up of subsystems each with inputs, transformation processes and outputs. Inputs, transformation processes, and outputs involve the acquisition and consumption of resources – money, labor, materials, equipment, buildings, land, administration and management. How value chain activities are carried out determines costs and affects profits.— IfM, Cambridge[2]

[Wikipedia: Value Chain (Porter)]

How does it related to IEEE 2675?

As related to DevOps, the Value Chain for Software Delivery is an application of a lifecycle perspective that scopes standards adherence to only certain individuals based on their participation in primary or supporting activities related to a particular software product.

DevOps is about continuously delivering value to users/customers/consumers. A value chain perspective disaggregates activities from an organizational funnel, making it easier for teams and consumers of a particular product or service to ask “does this thing meet the standard” without unintentionally including other unrelated teams or products, were the question be phrased as “does this organization meet the standard”.

What problem are we solving by using ‘value chain’?

Adoption. In large organizations with many independent groups or product teams, DevOps principals may apply across the value chain of one product, but not another, provided these products are completely independent from one another. For an organization or team to claim that a particular software product adheres to this standard, all aspects of that product’s value chain must implement the principals and practices set forth in this standard.

Examples of where the broadness of using “organization” presents a challenge to adoption:

  • Consulting agencies with many independent project teams on working on separate contracts/products
    • If only one of those contacts require adherence to 2675, does this require every team/contract (both in the future and retroactively) to do the same?
    • Using “value chain” would scope 2675 adherence to any and all parties performing activities germane to delivering that specific contract/product
    • We know that if even one team implements DevOps per 2675 and sees success, organizations are likely to grow that out to other teams over time; “value chain” helps adoption of the standard. 

  • Enterprises in the midst of transformation to DevOps
    • Can they claim adherence on a specific product if the “whole organization” can’t yet?
    • Much like the above agencies argument, when the scope of adherence is based on activities relating to delivery of a project, enterprises are far more capable of becoming “DevOps ready” because they can grow the practice out *over time*
    • In DevOps, key success factors are determined – driven – by customers, the end user.

  • Organization’s requirements from non-technical internal agencies
    • Can we expect that the legal or HR departments are also “DevOps”? 
      This would of course need to be defined by activities that support the delivery side of the business (i.e. billing, purchasing, etc.), begetting an activities-based perspective on implementation over organizational labeling

Why is this of importance to IEEE 2675?

In layman’s terms, adoption of IEEE 2675 at an organizational level can’t happen overnight, especially in large enterprises with many teams. Fortunately, it doesn’t have to, provided we adequately scope ‘shall’ statements with a perspective that A) is reasonable in scope and impact on the org, and B) enables parties to agree on what it means for a software product to have been developed and delivered using this standard.

How and where would we use ‘value chain’?

Places in the text where use of the word ‘organization’ could infer that IEEE 2675 must be implemented across the whole organization before any single team or product could claim adherence to the standard. For instance:

  • Too broad:

    “Organizations shall implement effective continuous delivery procedures aligned with the architecture definition in a manner that meets the business needs of the system.” … “DevOps itself requires effective architecture across the organization to ensure that application build, package and deployment procedures are implemented in a robust and consistent manner.” (6.4.4)

  • Scoped: 

    “Organizations shall implement effective continuous delivery procedures within a particular value chain that are aligned with the architecture definition and in a manner that meets the business needs of the system.” … “DevOps itself requires effective architecture across the whole value chain to ensure that application build, package and deployment procedures are implemented in a robust and consistent manner.”

  • Too broad: 

    “Organizations shall maintain an accurate record of both code deployed and fully automated mechanisms in order to remove obsolete code.”

  • Scoped:

    “Organizations shall maintain an accurate record of both code deployed and fully automated mechanisms in a value chain in order to remove obsolete code.”

Additional references:

Wanting vs. Having for My 7yr Old

I make a lot of mistakes. I try not to do it on Github where commits are a permanent record of your competencies. So are children, only the impact of a word said harshly or missed opportunity for positive reinforcement take immediate effect and often have lasting effects on their lives.

Taking my son and daughter out one-on-one to get gifts for the people in their lives is important to me, and despite sometimes feeling like it in the moment, is never a mistake in the ideal sense. Having a positive experience doing so is also part of a successful outing, because if it’s a negative experience, the whole thing is useless.

A few weekends ago, I went out with my daughter. When we finally ended up at the toy store to get something for her brother, naturally she found something for herself. Because she’s seven, and no matter how zoned in of a quick pow-pow we had outside before entering about who she’s here to shop for, she still looks at the world with her-eyes. Arguably we all do this, regardless of our age, defaulting to looking out for number one in all manner of situations. That day, it was a cheap, pink, plastic set of glam rings.

I said no, but I’ll think about it, and asked her to put them back and focus on her brother’s gift. What a mistake. She didn’t throw a fit or get weepy or shut down. I took a picture (for when I would come back in search of stocking stuffers) and moved on. The Big Day is a week away, and I realize there was a missed opportunity there and I have to find a moment with her when she gets them in her stocking to make this memory-point:

In life, the moment you want a thing and the moment you get it are often different.

If I had bought her that thing, what next? Should she have it right then, as inevitably she would. This is just kicking the ‘delayed gratification’ can down the road. And in juxtaposition with the notion of immediate positive reinforcements, her want wasn’t connected to a prior goal or reward plan. So no, I don’t just buy things because my kids want them, even when I can. It’s not just the principle that matters, my choices (a.k.a. commits to their codebase) have an immediate impact. The manner in which I roll those decisions out matters as much as the very moment of desire in their hearts.

So what will I do with this new hypothesis? As with all hypotheses, I will test it. On the morning of the Big Day, after all the things are unwrapped and people chill the fark back down and people have 2nd coffees and there’s bandwidth for sharing that learning, I will say to her:

“Love, I too seek the desires of your heart and will always support you in them. In life, the moment you want a thing and the moment you get it are often different times. Remember this thing, what you wanted weeks ago? Well I remembered and it’s been waiting for you the whole time. But there’s a time and a place, which is today! Trust in me, one who has gone before, that I can help you learn to deal with the waiting time between when you desire something and when you achieve it. Remember that my love for you is something you don’t always know how to see, but never doubt that it will always be there.”

AllDayDevOps 2018: Progressive Testing to Meet the Performance Imperative

Mostly as an appendix for references and readings, but whenever I can I like to have a self-hosted post to link everything back to about a particular presentation.

My slides for the presy: https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1OpniWRDgdbXSTqSs8g4ofXwRpE78RPjLmTkJX03o0Gg/edit?usp=sharing

Video stream: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DexfpnbBFn8

A few thoughts from my journal today (spelling and grammar checks off):

Will update as the conversation unfolds.

 

Adhocathon: Selenium Conf Chicago 2018 – Rstats in Grid

The goal of this time-boxed, scoped hackathon is to visualize the health and activities of a Selenium Grid instance by contributing the code necessary to report key metrics via Statsd. This supports observability and operational reliability requirements of continuous testing “at scale”.

Date/time: Thu Oct 18th, 6-8pm in the LaSalle room

Sign up here: https://goo.gl/forms/SztY8j7j83RZQEkJ2

Why Selenium Grid and Statsd?

Out of the box, visibility into how Selenium Grid is working/performing can be…limiting. This is a problem, because when a test fails (maybe multiple times), how can you quickly know where the issue originated (app, test, environment, data) if all of these things are not easily observable?

…and because lots of people use both of these technologies, or at least should, and they are both premised on separation of concerns at architecturally significant points, such as test-vs-environment and business-logic-vs-logging. Also, this is a stated potential area of focus for improvement by a few of the Selenium core contributors, and because the Statsd protocol has extremely wide-spread support in the industry.

Why So Last Minute at the Conference?

A few weeks ago while helping to organize DevOps Days Boston, I had a mental breakthrough about why testing gets talked about very little in organic DevOps communities: much of automated functional and non-functional testing doesn’t speak the same lingo as development and operations.

One of the core DoD organizers, Laura Stone, had just published a set of training videos on Statsd which I was impressed with, learned something from, and it struck home that we don’t have telemetry for Selenium Grid, a focus of my recent pet project during the day.

Many large organizations I work with use WebDriver extensively, and in order to fit something as critical as functional testing into a DevOps-minded delivery pipeline, software components and services must be operationally visible. The health of supportive dependencies, as they contribute affinities and deficiencies, are often as important as the health of primary deliverables.

So I had the courage to reach out to my volunteers’ contact at Selenium Conf Chicago about an idea I had on contributing to the Selenium project, namely layering in Statsd functionality into Selenium Grid to improve the observability.

Why Is This Not a Hackathon?

My ideas are shit. Not always, but most of life is an opportunity to learn what you don’t know. A majority of hackathons typically structure as a competition for prizes, and typically gravitate around some narrow vendor offering or are staged solely to promote some new service. Some business sets the tone and parameters, then judges contributions based on a set of meritable characteristics. This is not what I want.

In every area of my professional life, I look for opportunities to listen, learn, and deliver value. What better way to do those things that get a lot of other people to do them with you, multiplying the chances of exfoliating great ideas rapidly! The closest I know to this idea is a hackathon, but much of the work to getting the best ideas out quickly isn’t coding; it’s necessary, but often not the most relevant outcomes. So I needed a new name: “ADHOCATHON” is an iterative, time-boxed design-code-deliver session format.

How Is It Going to Go?

I have no idea. I often get these things right, like last month when I got 40+ managers together as a meetup to have a “forward dialog” about hiring and recruiting challenges and tips in the current Boston tech climate. The point is not that you know what to expect, but that you can facilitate the “best” outcomes to become a useful contribution.

That said, the conference organizers were happy to help however they could, and now we have a room at the venue right next to the first-day reception area. I have a number of customers and colleagues signed up to be there. There will be tweets going out via the conference handle. And I will have found my way into the place that Tim O’Reilly describes as “creating more value than you capture”.

For the next few days, I will be scrambling to provide minimalistic resources to accomplish this goal, such as:

Whatever happens, it will definitely be interesting. I’ll publish a follow-up article on what happened and outcomes here after the conference ends.

 

Engineering Is About More Than Code

Curiosity is what drives engineers, and is equal parts curse and companion. An engineer isn’t limited to development or operations. An engineer would be a problem-solver in both areas, probably more. Curiosity is a surprisingly rare quality in people, even in technology.

If you want to know how something works, take it apart and observe. My first digital systems disassembly was a Sony Discman in 1989. Whatever I did, I fixed it. The feeling was powerful. It just took me 25 years to realize that there are many broken things in the world and to prioritize which one’s I involve myself with. Understanding the problem is crucial.

This is how I approach many conversations, navigating purposely and politely until there’s a useful reframing. People aren’t things, so be kind, be sensitive, and be patient. When you engage, learn about their biggest challenges, how they approach things, and what drives them. Just start with that.

[If my 80’s discman was still around, it would be like “yup, those were the days”. My 8086 XT clone next to it would splutter out some op codes. My Mega Man game watch would be waterlogged and stuck in a loop. Which all lead me to the next action…]

Put things back together again so that they work, hopefully, better than before. It’s just courtesy. In commit-worthy code that’s called hygiene. In conversation, that’s called maintaining a shared view or vision. Do these things enough and you’ll find that the way to a common goal is easy easier than with clutter obscurring your journey, and for others’. When you can row in the same direction, you get to your destination a whole lot faster.

Put it with other things to see where it doesn’t work. That’s integration and it’s not always easy, especially if it’s your own code or new auto-scaling configuration that causes unforeseen things to blow up. Get to know what your thing does before and after you put it out in the wild. Be honest with yourself and others about the time this takes.

There are some things you can take apart, and some things you can’t. If you can’t or if it’s too much effort for not enough value, move on to another learning tool, but remain committed to your goal. In the light of fundamental flaws in how we think about security, privacy, and basic human welfare right now, seek something you’re proud and grateful to do. [There are some very worthy things happening in Boston right now.]

Subverting Social Bad Behavior with Community Service

Summary: personal aha…spend equal time on your community as you do on social media, and everyone will be better for it.

The Local Buffoonery of Garden Variety

When I woke, it was because of the shouting. That usually doesn’t happen in my neighborhood at two in the morning. I don’t mean like “hey, you forgot your beer on top of your car” kind of shouting, I mean the kind with curses and violence into the darkness of night. When I finally sat up to look down onto the street, between the fuzzy patches I saw a local taxi service driver furiously shaking his fist at something down the street yelling things.

As he used his mobile phone to call the cops, there was time to lite a…non-uniform cigarette…and pace around right in the middle of the blindest corner in town. Four more real cigarettes later and five flashing, silent police vehicles quickly swarmed what’s typically a peaceful daytime intersection that my apartment windows overlook. Two at a time, the tatted-up Ford Explorers sped away in the fisterly direction, leaving the final officer to take what I can only imagine was a confusing deposition and also a flashlight look-around to validate the driver’s story.

Today, Sunday, I drove downtown to ask the daytime taxi dispatcher what happened. I was expecting that I’d also have to stop up at the police station to get their official statement of what happened, but the guy at the desk knew the whole story and was happy enough to spill. Here it is.

After an overly complicated girlfriend-plus-other-friend pickup, some mentally imbalanced passenger, seeing a fare that surprised him as far too high, escalated an argument about the fare to an unexpected roundhouse punch to the driver’s head. That’s right, with two other people in the back, he temporarily disabled someone with the responsibility of driving them all somewhere on Eastern Point.

How doped up or insane does a passenger have to be to attack the driver? Why is this ragtag group of weirdos proceeding to somewhere on Eastern Point (very affluent)? Movie stupid, very upset, either or both. The world is really, truly crawling with crazy, fucked up people at all levels (especially in politics). And, like taxi drivers, sometimes you don’t have the economic luxury of pushing back on psychotic behavior when it comes your way because of what you do.

The Political Buffoonery of Friends and Neighbors

Assault is of course a crime…depending on who you are these days. It should be, it doesn’t work at very large scale in the commons where most of us live. But for some reason, everyone from the well-educated to the god-fearing seem to think that it’s open season on assaulting others who don’t share their beliefs. When it happens verbally on local social media (in particular, Facebook), I step back and ask, “what side of all of this do you want to be on?”

Take this guy I’d hope to call a friend, Jam. Jam is all kinds of good and crazy and well-intentioned. He runs a local blog, or maybe a cemetery where overly opinionated blog posts go to die, I don’t know at this point. Whatever he is, he’s complicated. Sadly, and rightly so, the current political climate has turned him into an-eye-for-an-eye asshole on social media. A counterpoint-liberalist, we’ll call him the Cook, recently said some things in response to Jam and other local liberals’ boycotting a local business for some insensitive things the conservative owner said. This is like Spanky and Our Gang vs. the Little Rascals type bullshit. “Not beef”, as some might call what this is.

This unwelcome display of reverse-perspective outreach sparked a knock-down, drag-out social media war between two individuals that are very reasonable when not provoked. But neither even saw what they were doing: focusing on the meta over the impact. Impact of their meta, more polarization. Opportunity cost of the meta over of useful action. Long-term impact of rejecting others’ views and position on their journey, a.k.a. karma. Acceptance that there is a shared journey. Acknowledgement that they may be wrong, no matter how much they think they’re right. That they are most certainly wrong if they think they’re the only one’s who can see something right. Complete subjectivity instead of focus on objective measures.

The result is that at least one of these parties is regretful and walking around hurt by it all. The worst thing is that I don’t think it’s my friend Jam. He still hasn’t worked his ego problems out before diving headlong into ‘other’ advocacy with women’s movement and anything else the overwhelmingly liberal-biased feeds feed him. All those things are good, but without love and respect, what good does it do for Jam to constantly interject himself?

It’s all buffoonery until we do something useful with others, not flashy or geeky or memorable or unusual. Not something that gets you a group photo with Captain Picard at a fancy inherited wealth house or the following to argue to against Trump multiple times a day instead of showing up to community roundtables about how to improve local education. Speaking from this experience, it was nice to be in a place where everyone practiced listening as much as they practiced having a spine and a heart. This is what I and others did yesterday from 3-5pm downtown. I don’t feel at all that way about the online shouting match Jam and the Cook participated in.

Don’t Let Nationalism Buffoonery Legitimize Local Buffoonery

You may think, “I’m so different than what’s going on politically right now, I need to speak out!” Please find more useful ways to argue with people over social media. Need solid reasons not to? How about that you won’t be permanently quoted in exquisite online conversational detail by an article like the one you’re reading now. How about, instead of counter-trolling, you could be sipping something nice right now. Fuck, anything but arguing with neighbors online.

Instead of escaping from the real world, think about how the way you view things affects those around you. How about that you don’t want your check-in with captured moments of friends and family to be perforated by “what’s trending” bullshit between town neighbors. Sure, share stories and articles that you’ve validated and make sense to you in various forums; but once an online conversation looks like it’s getting nasty, politely move along. Don’t let something as transparent and egotistical as “my blog swings 2,300 local votes” be your hood ornament. If people are being victimized, eject the violator and report their poor behavior.

In short, and to bring it full circle, don’t let a culture precipitated by a talentless, washed-up genital wart of a President and his cargo cult nationalist, supremacy-retrograding base suck you in to the human-capital machines that Jack Doorsey and Mark Zuckerberg built but now take it with their pants on from Russian mafia-state. Find me instead and we’ll identify something far more useful in our town to work on together. I’ve been collecting people’s challenges, many of them just take a little bit of help from others to overcome.

If you can’t be bothered to focus on useful activity over timespend on social media, at least try this: every minute you spend on social media this week, spend equal on something useful for the people who live around you. Can’t think of what that might be? I’ve got some ideas handy:

  • Donate supplies to a program that need it (this week, it was tampons)
  • Walk around your neighborhood (or just your block) and pick up trash
  • Clean up, repair something in, or just post pictures of a great little local park
  • Engage others to write about their local views over just your small clique
  • Prioritize and facilitate actionable community projects needing nothing more than hands and time to complete

When I see people not doing stuff like this, it’s usually the folks that maybe don’t deserve a seat at our community table. They like to bark, but don’t like to dig. They look influential, but are really inconsequential. They are simply taxpayers, not community members.

How to “Hire” into a “DevOps” Market

Let’s be clear. I’m mostly writing this so that I don’t have to have another bullshit conversation with a high-level agency “technical” recruiter that doesn’t really know what the hell DevOps really is. But before you misinterpret what’s to come as a horn-rimmed trash session on recruiters (only a motif, I promise), consider that had you not read to the end, you would never have learned how to hire more efficiently, effectively, and ethically.

Boston, We Have a Big Problem

Aside from the occasional scuffle at a Java meetup, I’m in the Greater Boston Area, and Boston isn’t exactly known as a shining example of the tech boom. Sure, we have Facebook, Amazon, ZipCar, TripAdvisor, Chewy, RaizLabs, and Pivotal amongst others. We also have Oracle, IBM, Salesforce, and a plethora of other institutionalized madness from the Fortune 500 which typically drags our communal technical proficiency rating down year after year. We also have some of the most dedicated, seasoned professionals which you’d be hard-pressed to find in Silicon Valley during a fictional OSCON meets AWS Re:invent meets RSA all rolled into one.

Our problem is hiring. Everyone everywhere does not have the problem quite like we do. Its potency is not diminished in the DevOps space simply because its a generally applicable point to make for any highly skilled market. When something is as culturally intertwined as True DevOps mindset is in high performing teams, traditional recruiting approaches will always fall flat on their face. What people are calling DevOps positions right now are a loose collection of uninformed guesses, buzzwords, poorly crafted hiring pitches, philosophical paradoxes, voodoo, and outright corporate misunderstandings.

Recruiter, Know Thyself

What’s required is simply a sea change in recruiting mindset: the fastest way to qualify people is for you to qualify yourself. I don’t mean credentials, I mean the way you ‘smell’. Not by your morning shower and shave, but by what real practitioners need to hear from your mouths in the first 30 seconds: “I’ve really been thinking about how to right-fit you and a few of my clients,” or something equally real and challenging. How about “I’m interested to know what kind of work you’d like to be doing…” or “Which do you like better, people or code?” (that one is for all you recruiters looking to place the even more elusive ‘DevOps Manager’ position, which as it turns out is just a normal technical manager that’s passionate about coaching and improvement and customers and building future leaders.)

Or you could just leave us really good hires out of it, focus on the email overload flowing from opaque B2B recruiting firms currently choking your inbox (yes, I have recruiter friends and we talk), and then you’d be bidding for the lowest common denominators and margins, not the highest ones. Good luck with that approach, it leads to burnout and we DevOps people know a million ways to get burnt out. But unless you’re ethically fine with placing unqualified people with unqualified teams for a buck, the first option is better for you and for everyone you churn through week after week.

Be Transparent..to a Fault

Recruiters and hiring managers, there is nothing worthwhile to hide from someone like me that isn’t abundantly already transparent through what you don’t know about the organization you represent. I don’t have to ask questions about the org, just about you and your relationship with actual decision-makers, and what you don’t understand or know enough about to hire on behalf of True DevOps teams properly.

To get over cursory technical qualifications, ask people for examples of their work, or better yet look for them first; the simple act of a prospect answering you with examples of their expertise (or simply knowledge to-date) in particular areas is something unqualified people can’t do and unmotivated people simply won’t do. If your candidate hasn’t used any of a dozen or more social platforms (like Stack Overflow, Medium, LinkedIn, etc.) to publish their own stuff, encourage them to so you can pass it along to the real decision makers.

Once these minimum-viable qualification hoops are behind us, bring something to the table. Have a spine and a brain and a perspective about the challenge you’re looking for my help to solve in an org. Understand the broader issues the organization you’re representing is having, then ask us which ones we think we actually have the desire and a real shot at helping to move forward.

Suspend disbelief for a moment…

Drop the bullshit. Tell us who your client is when we ask, how many and which positions they have open, how many other candidates you’re playing off each other for some high-dollar plot of glory, and for god’s sake be prepared to describe your client’s *engineering culture* like it was your own family. Go to a meetup every so often, or better, help to organize one. Sit through and listen, stop emailing from your phone through the presentations. Absorb what’s happening, how people respond to certain topics, and if you don’t find yourself startled awake by clapping, you may just learn something.

Against all corporate recruiting conventional wisdom, when a potential candidate comes at you with such Maslowian questions as “Can you tell me a bit about their culture?” and “What challenges there would I even be interested in?”, definitely don’t talk about benefits packages (that are mostly all the same at a certain level anyway) and please don’t use things like “occupational environment”, “team synergy”, or “interpersonal skills”. Please be real, explain to us what you do so we can understand if you do it better than anyone else we will talk to that week, and leave the qualification script at the door.

You’re selling you to us first, then you earn the right to sell your client to us. If the order of those two things is in reverse, it’s equally transparent where your placement priorities lie.

Hiring Managers: Who’s Doing Things Differently?

Off the top of my head, I can think of a few folks in the local Boston DevOps meetup that are good examples of how to place highly qualified practitioners:

  • Dave Fredricks, Founder, eninjia.io
    This guy is legit. Hard working, constantly advocating, and an early organizer of DevOps Days Boston, amongst other dedicated individuals.
    .
  • Sam Oliver, 3yrs self-employed recruiter, now FTE at PathAI
    This woman really rolls up her sleeves, as a co-organizer of the Boston DevOps meetups, and smartly carved out the “we’re hiring” pitches from the “let’s talk tech” conversation that this crowd is known to like as separate things. #listening
    .
  • Kara Lehman, Principal Recruitment Consultant, Huxley
    Her stock is climbing with me. We first chatted it up in 2017 and when I asked her what she was doing at the nerd-fest of a meetup at Pivotal, she said that she “needs to understand this thing called DevOps better”, which is far more enlightened of a response that about 99% of other local recruiters.

If your name isn’t in the above list, nothing personal, I’m writing this at 10pm on a Monday. Let’s have a conversation where I vet you out and then maybe I’ll write about you too. In the mean time, prepare yourself because it will be me who’s interviewing you.

Apologies and Thanks

If you got this far, my gift to you is my true gratefulness for feedback you may have and maybe a retroactive apology for saying things harshly. We need to cut through bullshit, especially the corporate flavors of it, and this is my personal blog anyway.

Recruiters: if you “can’t do these kinds of things” in the position you’re currently in, consider that you would probably earn far more by taking a new  approach (like the one in this article) on your own and making 100% commission on your own closes instead of a measly 50k/year plus.

Also, you can also reach out to me via LinkedIn and let’s talk about your challenges in hiring, training, managing, or fostering a DevOps-minded team. I’m much nicer in person than in this post.

More on DevOps:

Open Spaces at Swiftfest Boston

I’ll be hosting an open spaces “in the wild” session at Banyan Bar from 6pm-9pm at the end of Swiftfest Boston Tuesday June 19th 2018. Look for me and for people with party beads like this:

Location and Timing

We will be meeting at Banyan Bar right around the corner from the conference. Feel free to walk over after the conference ends at 6pm, the conversation will start at 7pm, and I’ll be handing out free drink tickets at around 8pm after we are done.

What is open spaces?

Open Spaces is an “unconferencey” way to have small group conversations on topics that are most relevant to our community at just the right time. You submit topics (http://bit.ly/openswift2018) that you want to discuss in a group setting, then before the event, these topics are grouped into categories that help people self-organize into right-fit groups.

What Will We Discuss?

Because this open spaces event is the last workshop session of SwiftFest Boston 2018 (http://swiftfest.io/), it’s likely that topics will gravitate towards technically-focused iOS development, testing, and operations, and team management. Great for conference attendees, great for Mobile Tea members too!

However, a key affinity of the open spaces approach is to let the community figure out what matters most right now, and there’s a lot going on in the broader tech scene in Boston today, like DevOps leadership, sustainable startup practices, effective technical recruitment, municipal transportation and infrastructure support, etc. You never know, and that’s the fun part!